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to provide a voice of the world. last week's european council agreed the overall limit on eu spending for the next seven years, starting in 2014. been agreed in the past, spending has gone up, but last week we agreed that spending should come down. by working with like-minded allies, we delivered a real- terms cut in what brussels can spend for the first time in history. as the house knows, the eu budget is negotiated annually, so what we were negotiating -- initially at the council last november and again last week -- was not the individual annual budgets, but rather the overall framework for the next seven years. this includes the overall ceilings on what can be spent -- effectively, the limit on the european union's credit card for the next seven years. during the last negotiation, which covered the period 2007 to 2013, the last government agreed to an 8% increase in the payments ceiling, to 943 billion. put simply, this gave the eu a credit card with a higher limit, and today we are still living with the results of allowing the eu's big spenders to push for more and more spending
the prospect of having to bail out failed banks and eu governments for perhaps years to come. they are still asking why no charges have been brought in the interest rate fixing scandal among top level banks. >> now, the german finance minister is set to present proposals to address that anger that will include a tightening of banking regulations. germany is not the only european country planning new laws against the reckless bankers that cost taxpayers billions. >> and number of european governments are drawing up new measures to prevent big banks from passing on the costs of high risk trading to taxpayers. in germany, a new draft law is due to be presented to the cabinet on wednesday. the proposed law would require major banks to separate their retail and investment banking. it also outlines plans for restructuring and liquidation in the event of a crisis, and bank executives are engaged -- who engage in reckless behavior could face up to five years in prison, and britain is also bound to pressure to rein in the excesses' of the system in the wake of the libor scandal and breaches of money
Search Results 0 to 2 of about 3 (some duplicates have been removed)

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